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  • Dezembro, 04. 2013

    Inhotim press room


    arttechnology

    Leitura: 3 min

    Sharing Art

    Sharing Art

    Inhotim has just joined Google Art Project’s online collection. From now on, people all over the world can walk through the Institute’s gardens and visit the galleries and outdoor artworks. Although nothing replaces an on-site visit to the park, surfing through the collection, wandering around different routes with Google Street View, exploring over 90 works created by names such as Miguel Rio BrancoTunga and Carlos Garaicoa is undoubtedly stimulating. In addition, it is an important step towards democratizing access to art.

    Besides high resolution images and texts about the works, the virtual tour holds a surprise for users. The work Celacanto Provoca Maremoto, by Brazilian artist Adriana Varejão, can be explored in details never seen before, since the image is available in gigapixel format, that is, one billion pixels. And it gets more beautiful every time you zoom in. 

      

    Google Art Project Inhotim

    Celacanto Provoca Maremoto, by Adriana Varejão, is available in gigapixel format.  

    Overall, Google Art Project provides works from 315 cultural institutions from various countries around the world, eight of which are from Brazil. The collection numbers more than 6 million online items. Don’t waste any more time: visit Google Cultural Institute’s website and explore the project. Take the opportunity to choose the route of your next visit to Inhotim. 

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    Dezembro, 03. 2013

    Inhotim press room


    communityhistory

    Leitura: 5 min

    Simplicity and history

    Simplicity and history

    Here, the day-to-day life is as calm as it is quiet. Very simple houses, scattered throughout the rugged terrain of the region. A low wheezing song, coming from an old radio placed close to the window is one of the only sounds that lull the afternoon. Shy people live there. Their gaze mixes fatigue and hope. Sometimes, they get watering eyes from remembering their childhood or a distant relative. This is the scenario at Marinhos and Sapé, two of the six former-slave communities (quilombola) scattered around Brumadinho (MG), settlements founded by fugitive slaves who worked in the region. Marinhos has about 200 inhabitants. Sapé, slightly smaller, has approximately 50 homes. Both, however, carry with them a past of resistance and good stories.

    Most residents, especially the elderly, can be considered a living portrait of a people struggling through work. Located in a region that used to house farms, many have learned to wake up in the morning and follow their parents in farm work. This is the case of housewife Maria Perpétua Socorro, 65 years old, born and raised in Sapé. “When we were kids, we worked from sunrise to sunset in the fields. My parents took my siblings and me to help them every single day. That’s how we were brought up”, she says.

      Dona Perpétua foto Rossana MagriWhen she was younger Perpétua used to help in the kitchen during typical celebrations. Photo: Rossana Magri

    The passing of the years has changed reality a bit. Currently, with the new rural practices, we found only small household gardens in residents’ backyards. “Today, thank God, that past no longer exists. I say so because we suffered a lot”, says Perpétua. The desires and goals of those who live in the villages have also changed. In the past, the path of a young person was almost invariably to marry someone and stay in the region, whereas today’s youngsters are increasingly coming to larger centers. “There aren´t many job opportunities here, means to study more, so they end up leaving when they grow up,” reveals Antônio das Graças Silva, Perpétua’s husband, who has two children.

    But despite the new reality, some practices and old values ??are still passed on from parents to children in the quilombola communities around Brumadinho. The traditional festivals and religious cults withstand time and are the state’s true cultural heritage. The Guardas de Congo e Moçambique – cultural and religious expressions of African influence organized by the people – take the streets several times a year, bringing colors and sounds that preserve local beliefs. Whether playing an instrument, carrying the crown or even helping in the kitchen, it is important not to let traditions die.

    Cortejo Congo Moc?ambique foto Rossana MagriThe Guardas de Congo e Moçambique mixtures pass, present and future. Photo: Rossana Magri

    Since childhood, teacher Nair Fatima Santana, a resident of Marinhos, participates in the parties and points out that they are the key to keep the memory and origins of the region. “The celebrations show a bit of what we were and what we are”, she explains. According to her, until recently the term “quilombola” used to bother them. “I did not like being recognized as a quilombola, because I thought it referred to someone who had suffered, who had no life perspective. But with time, I realized that I was just denying my own existence. Today I see that being a quilombola means being part of a people which has a meaningful story. During our celebrations is the very moment we are blessed. We try to teach part of that history to our children here at school”, she proudly concludes.

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    Novembro, 26. 2013

    Inhotim press room


    botany

    Leitura: 3 min

    Butterfly garden

    Butterfly garden

    They are always there. Flying around Inhotim, resting between plants and artworks. With various shapes and colors, the park’s butterflies are not there by chance: they are a sign that nature and man coexist in harmony at the Institute.

    In 2011, the Institute was listed as a Botanic Garden, and besides maintaining different plant collections, Inhotim develops botanical research on its environment. One of these studies particularly focuses on the Institute’s butterfly community. In partnership with Centro Unversitário UNA, from Belo Horizonte, researchers from Inhotim’s Department of Environmental Management have conducted this study since May 2012, aiming to map frugivores (which feed on decaying fruit, minerals and feces) and nectarivores (which feed on flower nectar and pollen) present at the visitation area at Inhotim. So far, more than 200 types of these insects have been identified, some of which rare in the region.

    In addition to scientific papers, the project yielded several developments, such as the Among Butterflies Theme Circuit, a tour that allows visitors to learn about how species are captured and identified, and also to learn how the animals are archived and displayed. “Our goal is to educate visitors on the importance of butterflies as a biological indicator for the environment and also unveiling myths,” says Cristiane Hubner, environmental assistant at Inhotim and one of the students responsible for the initiative. Also, an Photo Guide is currently being developed and there is a proposal for the creation of a butterfly garden.

    In partnership with Cerâmica Oti – factory that operates in the Institute and produces unique pieces for Inhotim gift shops – also created a line of products decorated with images of different butterflies identified during the study. “These products are utilities such as plates, mugs, cups, cake pans and even jugs. “The visitor can take home a product that mixes art and environmental awareness in many levels, from the concept to the choice of nonpolluting materials,” says Lea Diegues, artist responsible for the collection.

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    Novembro, 19. 2013

    Inhotim press room


    artyayoi kusama

    Leitura: 3 min

    Creative Obsession

    Creative Obsession

    Yayoi Kusama was still a child when she experienced her first hallucinations. The Japanese girl’s mind was then, inhabited by dots, balls and phallic shapes, which led to a compulsive disorder diagnosis. Aged eleven, the girl found a way to deal with her condition in using creativity. Currently, at the age of 84, still seeing the same shapes, she carries on working. The circular patterns, which have become a trademark for the artist, who is among Inhotim’s collection can be seen until January of 2014 in the works being displayed at Centro Cultural Banco do Brasil do Rio de Janeiro.

    Infinite Obsession features paintings, installations, videos, sculptures and other works, comprising Kusama’s first solo exhibition in Brazil. The CCBB visitor is invited to appreciate various artworks, such as Infinity Mirror Room — Phalli’s Field (1965), Fireflies on the Water (2012).  and Obliteration Room. The latter work is an interactive installation which was first conceived for the QueenslandArtGallery in 2002

    and invites the audience to share the artist ‘s obsession by pasting colored polka-dot stickers on a white room’s wall (see TateShots’ flabbergasting final result of the installation in London)

    Evocando o mito de Narciso, no Inhotim o visitante é convidado a apreciar sua própria imagem em um das  500 esferas de aço que flutuam sobre um espelho d’água. / Foto: Daniela Paoliello.

    The myth of Narcissus: Inhotim’s visitors are encouraged to appreciate their own reflection in one of the 500 steel balls floating on the water mirror. Photo: Daniela Paoliello.

     

    If you have been to Inhotim before, you are probably acquainted with the Narcissus garden Inhotim (2009). It is a version of a former artwork set up for the 33rd Venice Biennale. At the time, Yayoi Kusama surreptitiously spread 1,500 mirrored balls on the official pavilions’ lawn. While wandering about, the visitor would then pass by the installation and see the sign she had placed between the spheres, which read: “Your narcissism for sale.” The price?  $2 a piece. The artist was removed from the festival, where she would only set foot again 27 years later, now as a guest.

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    Novembro, 19. 2013

    Inhotim press room


    artopening

    Leitura: 3 min

    Disputing space

    Disputing space

     Concrete, iron, glass and wood. Those are some of the materials which artist Marcius Galan uses for his works, a genuine challenge to perception. Indianopolis-born, the American, who was brought up São Paulo, attended the Armando Alvares Penteado Foundation (Faap), a nationwide renowned institution which is a reference for plastic arts. Galan has been influenced by a vast number of artists, amongst which the Brazilians Waltercio Caldas and Cildo Meireles, as well as the American Gordon Matta-Clark, are entitled to a special highlight.

    Pondering on the concepts of movement, precision and balance, Marcius believes that illusion and reality walk side-by-side. “Many of my works might as well be faced as mathematical experiences. A line, for instance, has an apparent beginning and  end, but, at the same time, contains an infinite number of points.  The transgression of this notion of space is a fascinating thing. It is proof that we seek for measures and patterns in things which, in their essence, cannot be defined “, he says.

    At Inhotim, the artist has two works being exhibited. The first one, Seção Diagonal (2008), has been on display in Galeria Mata since 2010. Discovery and enchantment are amongst the feelings experienced by viewers when face-to-face with the presence of something that, in fact, does not exist. Finally, as part of the latest 2013 openings, the artist has set up his second work: Imóvel/Instável (2011). The art work, exhibited at Galeria Praça (the square gallery) plays around with notions of static mobility, evoking a of false movement idea. “The limit to space is variable and relative. What seems unbalanced can be in perfect balance provided it is analyzed all in all, “says Marcius Galan.

    Marcius Galan explains his latest work at the Inhotim: Imóvel/Instável. Check out the video:

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