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  • Julho, 16. 2014

    Inhotim press room


    artexhibition

    Leitura: 7 min

    Another look towards art history

    Another look towards art history

    Since June 27, Rio de Janeiro has witnessed the greatest international exhibit the city has ever seen. Organized by curators Rodrigo Moura, director of art and cultural programs at Inhotim, and Adriano Pedrosa, the artevida exhibit [literally, art&life] aims to tell the history of art based on references not found in major cultural centers. The exhibit features about 300 works of art by 110 artists from South America, Western Europe, the Middle East, Africa and Asia. Some of them, such as Brazilian artists Lygia Pape, Hélio Oiticica and Cildo Meireles, can also be seen at Inhotim.

    The name of the exhibit was not chosen by chance. For the neoconcretist movement that first appeared in Rio de Janeiro in the 1950s, art should establish dialogs and tensions related to aspects of life and of the world. This attitude was essential to form Brazilian contemporary art. On display at Casa França-Brasil, Parque Estadual Library and Parque Lage, the exhibit also expands to MAM Rio (Museum of Modern Art), starting this coming Saturday, July 19, with the opening of its second segment. Inhotim’s Blog talked to artevida curators, who told us a little bit more about the project. Read more below!

     

    Inhotim’s Blog – The exhibit gathers countries in the Southern Hemisphere to offer another look towards the history of art. How did this idea come about?

    Adriano Pedrosa and Rodrigo Moura – The research regarding the artists has been happening throughout the past several years. Many of the foreign and Brazilian artists are professionals we have worked with before. The sets and subsets of works were chosen based on knowledge and reflection on these works, but, above all, considering Brazilian perspectives. Thus, the section artevida (body), at Casa França-Brasil, has clusters of Brazilian and foreign works based on Bicho, Linha orgânica (both by Lygia Clark), on Tecelar (by Lygia Clark), on Parangolé (by Hélio Oiticica), generating close relationships that revisit the orthodox geometric abstraction, suggesting an organic and body-conscious form of thinking about the object and emphasizing the body as an activator of the artistic experience. On the other hand, in the section artevida (politics), thematic clusters are related to dictatorship regimes, war, violence, elections, censorship, demonstrations, work, feminism, racism, and seek this parallel between contexts which apparently are not connected, but that bear some kind of relationship with the Brazilian people.

    IB – How do the works chosen relate to hegemonic narratives in contemporary art?

    AP and RM – The exhibit looks towards the Brazilian production as a matrix and filter, so as to consider broader, more global relationships between different artistic contexts. We have prioritized this dialog with production hubs which are somehow closer to us, either because they share with us a colonial and post-colonial history, or recent history of authoritarian regimes, or, simply, because they are far from hegemonic production centers. There is a desire to untie an affiliation model that always goes through the center so that production can be legitimized. This doesn’t mean we deny our relationship with Eastern Europe and the United States at all.Actually, there are some artists from these regions present in the exhibit. What we propose are new dialogs, which have not yet taken place. If, in the first part, which we opened at Casa França-Brasil last month, this dialog happens by way of the body, whether through geometry or self-portraits, in the section that opens next Saturday at MAM Rio, this dialog happens through politics. This doesn’t mean an evolution in time, but rather a difference, a modulation of the curatorial framework.

    IB – Some of the names featured in the exhibit are present in Inhotim’s collection, such as Hélio Oiticica, Geta Bratescu and Hitoshi Nomura. How does the Institute’s collection dialog with this proposal to see art history from another angle?

    RM – It seems to me, this dialog happens in a very important way. As we mention in artevida’s curatorial statement, this is not an exhibit of a thesis, but of many hypotheses. This polyphonic representation is something I learned working in the formation of the collection, when this happens all the time. The artists you’ve mentioned have a very important place at Inhotim, precisely because they found such fertile soil when it comes to dialogs with Brazilian artists, they are central to building a narrative of what Inhotim represents as art: Lygia Pape, Cildo Meireles and Hélio Oiticica, for instance, are represented with such important works in our collection. At Inhotim, we’ve recently delved into areas we just knew superficially before, such as Western Europe and Japan, which have not yet been completely revealed, but that start to appear in exhibits at the Institute. This is the case of the individual exhibit by Romanian artist Geta Bratescu, at Galeria Lago as of September, and Do Objeto ao Mundo – Coleção Inhotim, at Palácio das Artes in December and at Itáu Cultural next year. In these exhibits, we are going to show quite a lot of Japanese material that have great resonance with the art produced in Brazil in the same period.

    Interested? Then plan to visit artevida!The exhibit will be open until September 21, 2014.

    Rodrigo Moura e Adriano Pedrosa

    Rodrigo Moura (left) and Adriano Pedrosa (right) at Parque Lage, where part of the exhibition takes place. Photo: Leo Aversa

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    Junho, 05. 2014

    Inhotim press room


    cultural programmingmusicnatural environment

    Leitura: 6 min

    Fernando Sodré performs at Inhotim

    Fernando Sodré performs at Inhotim

    Born in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Fernando Sodré is part of renewal movement in country viola. Last year, the artist released his third album, Viola de Ponta Cabeça [Upside-down Viola], in which he shows modern elaborated harmonies, executed with technique and precision. The result is contemporary jazz filled with influences, which he will be presenting at Inhotim this coming Saturday, June 7, at 3 p.m.With musicians Írio Júnior (piano), Esdras Neném (drums) and Enéias Xavier (bass), the viola player will also have Toninho Horta and harmonic player Gabriel Grossi as guests. Inhotim’s Blog has talked to Fernando about the concert and about his relationship with music. Check it out!

    Inhotim’s blog – You have roots in choro music, but there are also jazz elements to your music.How do you describe what you do?

    Fernando Sodré – I can say that what I play is Brazilian instrumental music. My arrangements are influenced by typical Brazilian rhythms and melodies such as choro, northeastern music and traditional music from Minas. I think it’s a mix of all that.I started out playing chorinho and only then jazz, with musician Alvimar Liberato. He introduced me to jazz and, from then on, I started studying it. In the beginning, the language was difficult for me, but I soon fell in love with it and added its elements to my music.

    IB – In your last album, as well as at Inhotim, you play with important musicians in the Minas Gerais scene. How did it feel to add these names to your work?

    FS – Enéias was the greatest responsible for this experience. I had known him for a while and we used to work together every now and then. Once, I was going to perform in Panama and drummer Márcio Bahia, who was going to play in the concert, could not travel with the band. Then, Enéias told me about Esdra (Neném). He played with us and it was a very nice experience. A few people know about this, but before thinking about Viola de Ponta Cabeça I intended to release a solo album. After this trip and other experiences, I changed my mind and decided to invite both of them to form a trio. We added other interesting elements to the recording, such as Irio’s piano and Gabriel Grossi’s harmonica. The result was a very free album, in which each one of us had a lot of autonomy to create within the arrangements proposed.Considering that we did it live, the gathering of influences and sounds was beyond my expectations. When I first listened to the tracks I noticed how well things fitted together.

    IB – Singer and songwriter Toninho Horta is also in the album and takes part in the performance at Inhotim. Tell us about this experience.

    FS – I’ve been a big fan of Toninho Horta for a long time.I have always listened to his music and he was one of my references. Throughout my career, I’ve always wanted to develop some sort of work with him. Through a common friend, I invited him when we were doing Viola de Ponta Cabeça. We sent the material, Toninho listened to it, liked it and agreed to be in the album. As soon as the recording started, he was very willing and engaged with the project. The result was this version of “Party in Olinda”, a track directed by him and that came up quite interesting.

    IB – About the concert on Saturday, what does it mean for you to perform at a place like Inhotim?

    FS – It is truly a fantastic opportunity to be able to play at a place that is respected and acknowledged both in Brazil and abroad such as Inhotim. I think my music dialogs very well with the place and the people there, so, my expectations are huge. I´m hoping it will be a great show. After all, the place’s atmosphere positively influences each track we’ll be playing. We will show a very diversified repertoire, with songs from the last album and from other ones, older ones. In addition to our base formation, Toninho Horta, Gabriel Grossi will also participate.

    IB – The performance is part of the program for the 10th Environment Week, which is taking place at Inhotim. How do you relate to the environmental issue?

    FS – It’s funny you mentioned this, because a lot of my music is created in places far from city centers. Rivers, farms, mountains, that is, places that haven’t undergone major alterations by men. Therefore, nature is a source of inspiration for me. Without it, it’s likely I would find difficulties with my creative process. Weeks such as this one are very important to raise everyone’s awareness about environmental issues.

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    Março, 13. 2014

    Inhotim press room


    artcultural programming

    Leitura: 7 min

    Contemporary dance at Inhotim

    Contemporary dance at Inhotim

    Thinking about women and how they relate with space, French choreographer and dancer Cecile Proust developed the femmeuseposturalE show. Relying on a group of multigenerational professional and amateur dancers coming from different backgrounds, the performances use contemporary dance to explore issues such as the construction of the female genre. Visiting Minas Gerais for the third time, Cecile is currently making the final adjustments in the performances that will take place this week at Inhotim, on March 14 and 15. Between rehearsals in the Institute’s gardens, the choreographer took a break to talk to Blog do Inhotim. Comfortably sitting in one of the benches by Hugo França, she talked about performing at the park, as well as about her view on women in today’s society, her influences and much more.  Read everything in the interview that follows.

    Blog do Inhotim – How did the idea for this show come about?

    Cecile Proust – From the beginning, the Femmeuse evokes the question of gender, feminism, art and the connections that can be made between these points. The performances presented in femmeuseposturalE are a female answer to the work of French choreographer Fabrice Ramalingom, Postural: études, created for a group of 15 men. We made this work with choreographies presented only by women. In this work, we can find influences of Odile Duboc [French director] and American director Bob Wilson, with whom I have worked before. There are several other influences, but Brazilian painter and sculptor Lygia Clark has also brought a lot of references.

    BI – What is your view on women in today’s society and which message does the show wish to convey in regard to women?

    CP – It is hard to define the woman in today’s society with accuracy, for there are millions of them and they are all different from one another. I believe we should all just leave the word and space free for them. Each woman should be able to express herself in the several different ways she can. Therefore, we should leave this space open and let the invisible emerge within women. This is precisely what the show explores, women’s freedom of movement within the space they occupy. .

    BI – The choreographies are performed with professional and amateur dancers, including Inhotim employees. What is the intent of this proposal?

    CP – We specifically seek these different bodies working for the dance, rather than just one. This way we can bring out different experiences and effects and observe how these women’s bodies mingle with one other during the choreography. This professional-amateur relationship makes the performance unique, different in every movement, and this is reflected both for the dancers and for the audience.

    BI – How does it feel to have Inhotim as the setting for this performance?

    CP – It is wonderful. This place is truly amazing. Also, working with choreographies that involve works such as Desert Park (2010), by Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster and Piscina (2009), by Jorge Macchi, like we are going to do, is even more interesting, since both these works have great impact on the body, on energy and on space itself. The thing is, the whole of Inhotim is exceptional and mesmerizing right off the bat. I remember when we first came here back in 2012, Jacques [Hoepffner, visual artist and partner in preparing the show] and I only had half a day to visit the park. But even though this first visit was a quick one, we looked around and said, “Wow! We want to develop a project here”. And today this has been made possible.

    BI – What unique aspect has Inhotim brought to these performances?

    CP – Well, it is important to say that the performances we will be presenting here have been created specifically for this place, and they are related to these who artworks were will be using as the setting. Even with the connections we can draw between these performances and other materials from choreographers in France, or even other works I have developed in the past, at Inhotim we have this special relationship with space, nature, the weather, the vegetation, which is totally different from what we are used to in Europe. All of this brings unique elements to the choreographies and is totally aligned with this strong relationship with the environment developed in this work.

    BI – What are your expectations for the work at Inhotim?

    CP – It is hard to foresee what is going to happen, but often what we expect changes a bit when it becomes real, which ends up being one of the most fascinating aspects of this presentation. I believe something that is interesting and very typical of the artistic work is to allow yourself to be transformed by experiences and by those working with you. Our project is totally transformed by those who take part in the presentations, as well as by the space itself. Of course we have an idea of the results, but what truly matters is this transformation and how the place can impact the performances. We are always curious to know what will happen. I think the same thing happens with the audience.

    Are you also curious to know the result of the performance? Then, make sure to go to Inhotim and check out the femmeuseposturalE. Click here for more details on this performance.

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    Fevereiro, 25. 2014

    Inhotim press room


    Leitura: 3 min

    Where does the Carnival come from?

    Where does the Carnival come from?

    Not everyone knows, but the Carnival is much older than Dodo and Osmar’s trios elétricos (musical floats used in Brazilian Carnival) in Salvador, Bahia. This popular festival has its origins in celebrations such Saturnalia, when Ancient Rome used to stop everything to celebrate god Saturn. According to mythology, he was the one who taught the practice of agriculture to men, and in these days of celebration that took place in December, friends would treat one another to flowers and typical food of the season.

    Using this story as a background, people visiting Inhotim during Carnival will be treated to seeds of licuri palm (Syagrus) and butiá (Butia) as a way to thank the public and nature for making the park an unique and transforming place. These species were not chosen by chance. Besides being part of the gardens, they are portrayed in several works by artist Luiz Zerbini, on display at the amor lugar comum (love, a commonplace) exhibit, installed at Galeria Praça since October 2013.

    The work "Mar do Japão" (2010), by Luiz Zerbini, in exhibition at Galeria Praça.

    The work “Mar do Japão” (2010), by Luiz Zerbini, in exhibition at Galeria Praça.

    As for the work Olê ô picolê (2007) (Here comes the popsicle) , by Marepe (learn more about him here), displayed at Galeria Lago, educators will make interventions focused on popsicle carts that will circulate throughout the park. Visitors will receive clippings about the artist or texts written by him, as an invitation to learn about his work.

    In addition, children will be invited to prepare Carnival masks with materials that would otherwise be discarded. The actions take place in the park, Saturday (1/3), Tuesday (4/3), from 10h to 12h and 14h to 16h. To learn more click here.

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    Fevereiro, 07. 2014

    Inhotim press room


    brumadinhocommunityeducacionmusic

    Leitura: 6 min

    Melodies that lull your dreams

    Melodies that lull your dreams

    Music to make you dream high. This is what Inhotim’s new music project coordinator, Maestro César Timóteo, keeps in mind when he plans the future.  Son of a pianist mother, César began studying the violin as a child. Today, as a violinist, opera singer and conductor, he seeks to awaken the musicality and talent of each student taking part in the projects he will be in charge of. The Maestro talked to Inhotim’s Blog and told us a little bit about his career and experiences in this new phase of his life.

    Blog do Inhotim – Tell us a bit about your career in music.

     

    César Timóteo – I can´t single out the exact moment music really got me.  My mother is a pianist and this has influenced me a great deal.  Through her, I was able to be in contact with is fascinating art from a very early age.  I started studying the violin when I was nine, and became a professional violinist in my teenage years.  Later, I also got my Opera Singing Degree, taking part in performances as a soloist in operas and religious plays.  After working as a violinist and singer for several years, I decided to study orchestral conducting, which became my main occupation in music.  I had the opportunity to conduct orchestras in Brazil and abroad, in addition to working with great music professionals, who have significantly influenced me. Some of these them I would like to mention are violinist Max Teppich and Maestro Isaac Karabtchevsky.   

     

     BI – What is your opinion on the musical potential of Brumadinho and its residents? 

    CT – Music is part of the development of all communities. It is a necessity.  Brumadinho is no different. We have to provide opportunities for people to learn it, awakening the musicality within them.   Leaning music, whether by means of a musical instrument or signing, tends to organize and blossom out this musicality, leading to balance, development and the possibility of dreaming higher.  I have no doubt that Brumadinho is filled with music talents, which will certainly be revealed.  

    BI – Which projects are you going to be coordinating? Talk a bit more about each one of them.

    CT – Youth, Adult and Kid’s Choirs and the School for Strings. These projects are carried out by Inhotim, sponsored by Vale do Rio Doce and are part of an initiative of the Department of Culture.  In 2014, we are going to work in a more unified way, with a team of guest teachers from Belo Horizonte. These projects are intended to promote social, musical and artistic development in communities located at Vale Médio do Paraopeba, which includes youngsters from Brumadinho, Mario Campos and Bonfim.  Most of the students come from the public school system and, with the projects, they have the opportunity to take free theoretical and practical lessons.

     Classes take place on a weekly basis and the students enrolled are able to study vocal technique and music theory, in addition to practice instruments such as:  violin, viola, cello and bass.  During choir and orchestra practices, students are able to experience music as part of a group, developing their harmonic perception and cooperative work.  Enrollment happens twice a year and those interested in participating must apply at the project headquarter in Brumadinho. 

    BI – In 2014, what’s new when it comes to the projects developed by Inhotim?

    CT – We are going to work to unify music-related social projects, considering a nationwide reach.  It is important to consolidate actions in Brumadinho and surrounding areas, so that some time from now we can also reach other towns.  We are going to value joint actions.  The music experience must happen in a less individual and more collective way.  We are also going to  purchase two new pianos to be used in choir activities, as well as in musical perception classes. Also, we will be able to rely on new facilities in Brumadinho, which will be larger and more suitable for classes and rehearsals. 

    BI – What are your expectations for this new journey with the students taking part in the projects?

    CT – I want to closely monitor the development of each student. It is important to know them, so that we can guide them in the right direction.  I hope to see their musical growth, to see them dreaming with new possibilities.   Art does that.  I hope music learning and musical practice will influence the human development of students as well as of Brumadinho community.  I hope this can bring a positive effect to their decisions and attitudes, promoting better quality of life and improving the way they live in society.

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