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  • Março, 23. 2014

    Inhotim press room


    history

    Leitura: 3 min

    Macaúba Palm and its fruit

    Macaúba Palm and its fruit

    Inhotim is known for gathering one of the largest palm tree collections in the world, currently with over 700 species from several different places. Among these species is the macaúba palm (Acrocomia aculeata). The species is native to Brazil and its history at the park is quite interesting. In 2012, about 80 specimens were incorporated into the botanical garden by way of a major rescuing action carried out at a mining area near the Institute. Even though the cutting down of these specimens was environmentally authorized, they were saved and incorporated into the Institute’s landscape project.

    Also known as bocaiúva palm or coyol palm, the macaúba palm is found practically everywhere in Brazil and pretty much everything in the plant can be used. The pulp from its fruit is used to produce flour. Rich in vitamin A and beta-carotene, it can be used in juices, ice-cream, cake, bread and sweets. The leaves can be used to make fishing nets and lines. The wood, on the other hand, is used in houses and other constructions. In addition, soap, margarine and cosmetics are made with the oil extracted from the macaúba seed.

    A imponente da palmeira macaúba. Foto: Rossana Magri

    The imponent Macaúba Palm. Photo: Rossana Magri

    Brazil currently conducts studies with macaúba focused on the production of biodiesel, a fuel made from vegetable oils. As they realize the potential of this species, scientists have been more and more enthusiastic about the results obtained in these studies. By the end of 2014 Inhotim will begin studies on the spreading of this palm tree, as seed dormancy breaking outside its natural environment is rare and little known.

    Do you want to learn a bit more about Inhotim Botanical Garden and about the macaúba palm?  Then click here and watch the video.

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    Março, 18. 2014

    Inhotim press room


    botanyopeningvisit

    Leitura: 3 min

    New Orchid Greenhouse at Inhotim

    New Orchid Greenhouse at Inhotim

    Next Saturday, March 22, Inhotim Botanical Garden opens another thematic space. The new Vanda Orchid Greenhouse will gather about 350 orchids from the Vanda group, originating from Southeast Asia and Australia, and it will be the only greenhouse of the kind open to the public in Brazil. The event will be the ideal opportunity to see about 50% of these plants flowering at the same time.

    The creation of an area dedicated to these rare orchids is part of a conservation project carried out by the Institute and intended to collaborate with the maintenance of these vulnerable species. Those visiting the Vanda Orchid Greenhouse on its opening day will have the chance to talk with orchid specialist Delfina de Araújo and discover interesting facts about these plants. The Blog do Inhotim chatted with the scholar, who gave some tips on how to cultivate this species. Check it out!

    – The flowering of the Vandaceous lasts 40 days on average. A good tip to extend this period is to keep the plant away from lamps. The heat they emit causes flowers to dry and wither;

    – Sun and excessive heat are also harmful because they lead to plant water loss. So keep the flowers in a cool place;

    – The vandaceous should be watered every day, always in the morning. Use preferably a spray bottle and water them until the roots turn green and lose the pearlescent appearance;

    – After the loss of flowers, water the plant daily and apply specific fertilizers for this species. They should be kept in a bright place, but away from direct sunlight.

    Click here to learn more about the new Vanda Orchid Greenhouse.

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    Março, 13. 2014

    Inhotim press room


    artcultural programming

    Leitura: 7 min

    Contemporary dance at Inhotim

    Contemporary dance at Inhotim

    Thinking about women and how they relate with space, French choreographer and dancer Cecile Proust developed the femmeuseposturalE show. Relying on a group of multigenerational professional and amateur dancers coming from different backgrounds, the performances use contemporary dance to explore issues such as the construction of the female genre. Visiting Minas Gerais for the third time, Cecile is currently making the final adjustments in the performances that will take place this week at Inhotim, on March 14 and 15. Between rehearsals in the Institute’s gardens, the choreographer took a break to talk to Blog do Inhotim. Comfortably sitting in one of the benches by Hugo França, she talked about performing at the park, as well as about her view on women in today’s society, her influences and much more.  Read everything in the interview that follows.

    Blog do Inhotim – How did the idea for this show come about?

    Cecile Proust – From the beginning, the Femmeuse evokes the question of gender, feminism, art and the connections that can be made between these points. The performances presented in femmeuseposturalE are a female answer to the work of French choreographer Fabrice Ramalingom, Postural: études, created for a group of 15 men. We made this work with choreographies presented only by women. In this work, we can find influences of Odile Duboc [French director] and American director Bob Wilson, with whom I have worked before. There are several other influences, but Brazilian painter and sculptor Lygia Clark has also brought a lot of references.

    BI – What is your view on women in today’s society and which message does the show wish to convey in regard to women?

    CP – It is hard to define the woman in today’s society with accuracy, for there are millions of them and they are all different from one another. I believe we should all just leave the word and space free for them. Each woman should be able to express herself in the several different ways she can. Therefore, we should leave this space open and let the invisible emerge within women. This is precisely what the show explores, women’s freedom of movement within the space they occupy. .

    BI – The choreographies are performed with professional and amateur dancers, including Inhotim employees. What is the intent of this proposal?

    CP – We specifically seek these different bodies working for the dance, rather than just one. This way we can bring out different experiences and effects and observe how these women’s bodies mingle with one other during the choreography. This professional-amateur relationship makes the performance unique, different in every movement, and this is reflected both for the dancers and for the audience.

    BI – How does it feel to have Inhotim as the setting for this performance?

    CP – It is wonderful. This place is truly amazing. Also, working with choreographies that involve works such as Desert Park (2010), by Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster and Piscina (2009), by Jorge Macchi, like we are going to do, is even more interesting, since both these works have great impact on the body, on energy and on space itself. The thing is, the whole of Inhotim is exceptional and mesmerizing right off the bat. I remember when we first came here back in 2012, Jacques [Hoepffner, visual artist and partner in preparing the show] and I only had half a day to visit the park. But even though this first visit was a quick one, we looked around and said, “Wow! We want to develop a project here”. And today this has been made possible.

    BI – What unique aspect has Inhotim brought to these performances?

    CP – Well, it is important to say that the performances we will be presenting here have been created specifically for this place, and they are related to these who artworks were will be using as the setting. Even with the connections we can draw between these performances and other materials from choreographers in France, or even other works I have developed in the past, at Inhotim we have this special relationship with space, nature, the weather, the vegetation, which is totally different from what we are used to in Europe. All of this brings unique elements to the choreographies and is totally aligned with this strong relationship with the environment developed in this work.

    BI – What are your expectations for the work at Inhotim?

    CP – It is hard to foresee what is going to happen, but often what we expect changes a bit when it becomes real, which ends up being one of the most fascinating aspects of this presentation. I believe something that is interesting and very typical of the artistic work is to allow yourself to be transformed by experiences and by those working with you. Our project is totally transformed by those who take part in the presentations, as well as by the space itself. Of course we have an idea of the results, but what truly matters is this transformation and how the place can impact the performances. We are always curious to know what will happen. I think the same thing happens with the audience.

    Are you also curious to know the result of the performance? Then, make sure to go to Inhotim and check out the femmeuseposturalE. Click here for more details on this performance.

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    Março, 11. 2014

    Inhotim press room


    cultural programmingeducacioninhotim schoolmusic

    Leitura: 3 min

    What’s new at Inhotim Escola 2014

    What’s new at Inhotim Escola 2014

    The second year of Inhotim Escola promises to shake up Belo Horizonte’s agenda. Art exhibitions, films, lectures, courses, workshops and a novelty: in 2014 the the environmental theme comes in to play with the project Consumo Consciente na Praça [Concious Consumption at the Park]. Starting in April, it will promote discussions on consumption habits of modern society so as to build a more sustainable life style.

    Among the actions planned for the year is the Dia do Carbono Zero [Zero Carbon Day], which aims to promote the reduction of emissions of greenhouse gases. Moreover, two-wheel lovers will be able to participate in the Pedal Verde, a bike circuit going through the southern-central region of Belo Horizonte aimed at raising awareness to the issue of urban mobility in the state capital.

    O Sarau realizado pelo Inhotim Escola em 2013 reuniu diversas pessoas na Praça da Liberdade, em Belo Horizonte.

    The soiree held by Inhotim Escola in 2013 gathered several people at Praça da Liberdade, in Belo Horizonte. Photo: Ricardo Mallaco

    As for the arts, also in April, the public will have the opportunity to chat with Inhotim’s curator Jochen Volz on the relationship between art and architecture in the construction of art pavilions. Jochen has organized several exhibitions in Brazil and abroad, including international shows in the 53rd Venice Biennale. Since 2012, Jochen is also chief curator of the Serpentine Gallery in London. Among other activities, the schedule of Inhotim Escola includes the seminar Visão Yanomami [Yanomami Vision], whose theme is the work of photographer Claudia Andujar. Swiss living in Brazil since the 1950s, besides registering the life of the Yanomami people, Andujar became a major activist for indigenous cause in Brazil.

    The old buildings that are part of the Circuito Cultural Praça da Liberdade will still host part of the activities. But this year, Inhotim Escola expands its actions to different locations in the state capital and other cities, and it will no longer have a fixed venue in Belo Horizonte. So far, the actions developed by the project have involved over two thousand participants.

    Interested? Find out more about lnhotim Escola here.

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    Março, 07. 2014

    Inhotim press room


    botanyvisit

    Leitura: 2 min

    Garden of Stones

    Garden of Stones

    Amid the lush gardens of Inhotim, a novelty has drawn attention of visitors. The Garden of Stones, near the Educational Plant Nursery, was inspired by the desert landscapes of Mexico and gathers plants that are rich in beauty, despite the limited availability of water.

    There is an explanation for the idea of ??creating such a different garden. Inhotim’s agronomist Livia Lana  explains, “We already had several species, some even rare. Then, we create a special environment where it is possible to understand the context in which they live”.

    Foto: Rossana Magri

    Picture: Rossana Magri

    The specimens that comprise the Garden of Stones come from deserts as well as from arid regions in Brazil, and include Cactaceae, Crassulaceae and Euphorbiaceae. Despite their complicated names, these plants are widely used in landscaping and their maintenance is relatively simple. The hard part of the job was to transform the local soil to receive the seedlings, which was done by using mainly sand and stones.

    On your next visit, make sure to visit this exotic garden. Click here to learn more about the botanical richness of Inhotim.

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